Introduction

Imagine you’re developing a feature-rich Task Management Application using Angular. To ensure a robust and maintainable codebase, let’s see how SOLID Principles can guide your development journey.

The YouTube Channels in both English (En) and French (Fr) are now accessible, feel free to subscribe by clicking here.

The SOLID Principles

In the dynamic realm of software development, crafting robust and maintainable code is paramount. One methodology that stands as a cornerstone for achieving this goal is the adoption of SOLID Principles. Understanding SOLID Principles can elevate your software design skills to new heights.

The SOLID Principles are made of five concepts, which are:

  1. Single Responsibility
  2. Open-Closed
  3. Liskov Substitution
  4. Interface Segregation
  5. Dependency Inversion

In the following sections, we’ll see how to put in place these principles with practical examples applied to Angular projects.

SOLID Principles in Angular

Single Responsibility Principle (SRP)

Each Angular component takes on a single role. For instance, you have separate components for task creation, task listing, and task details. This ensures that components are focused, easier to understand, and more reusable.

Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project
Single Responsibility Principle (SRP)

Open-Closed Principle (OCP)

You should design the app to be open for extension but closed for modification. When adding new task types, you create new classes that inherit from a base Task class. This way, you can add features without altering existing code, ensuring stability.

Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project
Open-Closed Principle (OCP)

Liskov Substitution Principle (LSP)

Suppose you introduce different types of tasks: “SimpleTask” and “ComplexTask.” Applying LSP, you ensure that any component designed for the base Task class can seamlessly work with its derived types without causing unexpected behavior.

Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project
Liskov Substitution Principle (LSP)

Interface Segregation Principle (ISP)

Implement distinct interfaces for different aspects of the app. For example, you create separate interfaces for task creation and task editing. This prevents components from being burdened with unnecessary methods, promoting clarity and maintainability.

Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project
Interface Segregation Principle (ISP)

Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP)

You use dependency injection extensively. Components depend on abstractions (interfaces) for services like task storage and notifications. This way, you can effortlessly swap out implementations without affecting the components’ behavior.

Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project
Dependency Inversion Principle (DIP)

Practical Implementation

  • Create an ITask interface and have SimpleTask and ComplexTask classes implement it.
  • Develop separate components for adding tasks, listing tasks, and displaying task details.
  • Use Angular services to manage task storage and notifications, injecting them into components for loose coupling.
  • Leverage reactive programming with RxJS to handle task updates and real-time changes. By weaving SOLID principles into your Task Management App, you’re ensuring that your.
Apply SOLID Principles in a Real Angular Project

———————

We have just started our journey to build a network of professionals to grow even more our free knowledge-sharing community that’ll give you a chance to learn interesting things about topics like cloud computing, software development, and software architectures while keeping the door open to more opportunities.

Does this speak to you? If YES, feel free to Join our Discord Server to stay in touch with the community and be part of independently organized events.

———————

Conclusion

In the end, the Angular codebase is not just functional, but also maintainable, adaptable, and ready for growth. Have you encountered any challenges or successes while applying SOLID principles in your Angular projects? Let’s exchange stories and insights in the comments! Stay turn for more other nice content.

Thanks for reading this article. Like, recommend, and share if you enjoyed it. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn for more content.